International organization warns: fuel shortage affects hundreds of thousands of children and their families in Yemen

International organization warns: fuel shortage affects hundreds of thousands of children and their families in Yemen


An international organization warned Wednesday that hundreds of thousands of children and their families in Yemen have been affected by the fuel crisis in the north of the country.

Save the Children said in a statement read by Al-Masdar Online, "The lack of fuel in northern Yemen will affect hundreds of thousands of children and their families already affected by a five-year humanitarian crisis,"

"There is an increased risk of a surge in cholera and other water-borne diseases, because water filtration systems are unable to operate and trucks carrying safe water are waiting for fuel," the statement said.

"Fuel shortages are causing food prices to increase and a worsening health crisis, as deliveries of food and medical supplies take longer and hospitals need diesel to operate their generators," the statement said.

"This situation will increase the suffering of children and their families in the world's worst humanitarian crisis," as per the statement.

"The surge in transport prices means that parents are unable to afford to take their children to hospital," the organization warned.

"There is a 60% reduction in the amount of fuel coming through the port of Hodeidah, due to a decision by the Yemeni government to pay customs duties in Aden before allowing ships to unload in Hodeidah," said Tamer Kerels, director of the organization.

He called on the international community to work with the Yemeni government to waive the decree immediately so that the crisis could be avoided.

"Yemen is already facing a continuing cholera outbreak, with more than 62,34 suspected cases identified this year, of which 25% were children under the age of five," the statement said.

Other public services, including wastewater treatment plants, will be affected, creating potential for significant public health risks, such as sewage flow, the organization said.

The provinces under the Houthi militia are experiencing a severe fuel crisis, which the Yemeni government has attributed to the militia's refusal to deal with the government's 2019 decision on customs duties and taxes on shipments of oil derivatives.

The Yemeni government accuses the militia of trading in oil derivatives in order to finance the war effort and military operations it is conducting against government forces in a number of provinces.


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